Dr. Johanna Budwig

Gail sent this information, which is of great interest.

Dr. Johanna Budwig

Dr. Johanna Budwig’s Diet and Protocol

Learn how to make the mixture

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7 Comments on “Dr. Johanna Budwig”

  1. Katy Widger says:

    Yes! Yes! Yes! This lady is right on! In America, the work of Dr. Weston A. Price was very similar, and through a number of serendipidous occurances, Ken and I found ourselves on a journey of health and healing in following his foundations’ recommendations. They have a web site at http://www.westonaprice.org and also the Price/Pottenger Foundation (Dr. Francis Pottenger was the doctor famous for doing the raw diet study on cats in the 50’s). Dr. Price was a dentist was traveled the world in the 50’s trying to discover why native populations who maintained traditional lifestyles and diets enjoyed such robust health and good teeth and bone structure. His discoveries involved much the same discoveries as Dr. Budwig’s: eating “good” fats, animal protein, fermented (organic) vegetables, grass fed meat products and whole fat, non-pasturized (raw) dairy products and eggs.
    Ken and I have changed our whole lifestyle to incorporate these foods and to be able to produce many of them ourselves, with amazing results to our health. We began doing this because I suffered from some very serious health issues, and having no access to health insurance (a blessing in disguise!), I knew I had to effect a “cure” on my own. After almost three years, I am now in perfect health, no aches and pains or any of the problems that I had before starting this journey. All gone! Vibrant, energy-filled, glowing health left in its place!

    We feed Zeke a raw diet based on this protocol. All our other animals also are enjoying a species appropriate diet following these guidelines.
    I use the book “Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats, The Ultimate Diet” by Kymythy R. Schultze as my guide in addition to the other raw diet “gurus”. Also, the advice of a holistic vet, who also followed her protocol. She recommended the use of fish oil and cod liver oil instead of flaxseed oil, however, as more appropriate for carnivores. Interestingly, my own OBGYN/Naturopath (who follows Weston Price protocols and has her own goats, too), also had me switch from flaxseed oil to cod liver oil because of my racial heritage, Celtic, because she felt I would utilize the cod liver oil better, and, indeed, I think she was right.)
    Use what works for your own dog and your own body. Just buy good quality products, not the cheap stuff! Rancid is worse than none at all!
    If it’s not in the refrigerator section of your local health food store, don’t buy it.

    We have the advantage of having our own goats so we can produce chevre (which is similar to quark), and many other raw dairy products, including real kefir (fermented raw milk similar to buttermilk, but containing the very best probiotics known, far superior to yogurt).
    Raw dairy, veggies and fermented products contain living enzymes necessary for the digestion and assimilation of the calcium, minerals and other micro-nutrients contained within them. If we don’t eat the enzyme-containing foods, our pancrease must supply them, and when our pancreas is depleted, disease sets in. Our Standard American Diet (SAD) for both people and animals just sets us up for this with all the dead, processed food we eat.

    You can make a good “quark” substitute by following the instructions on the Budwig site for draining whole milk (full fat!) yogurt. Brown Cow or Strauss is a good brand, or if you can find goat milk yogurt, so much the better. Then, use some of the whey that drains off for making fermented veggies for your dog: I use my Kitchen Aide food grinder, but a food processor will work as well.
    Wash first, remove any “bad” parts, then: Grind approx. one quart of mixed ORGANIC ONLY veggies, including zucchini, carrots, tomatoes, green beans, chard, kale, sweet potatoes, yams, broccolli, you get the picture, and include some parlsey, garlic and ginger (all organic!). Mix with 1 T. sea salt, and 4 T. whey. Put into a clean quart jar, and add filtered water to cover if necessary. Leave one inch headspace. Put lid on and leave out at room temp for 48 hours. Then refrigerate and use a teaspoon or so per day for small dogs, as their “veggie” to mix in with their other raw food . This is a close approximation to what a predator would eat in a prey animal’s stomach. The lactic acid fermentation releases even more nutrients than eating the veggies raw or steamed, increases the enzymes and preserves the veggies for months!
    We eat many of our own veggies fermented in this way, like “real” dill pickles.
    A great book for humans is Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, available through the Price website or on Amazon. It’s a 500 page virtual education on eating the way our ancestors ate, with recipes that are as delicious as they are nutritious, including all sorts of fermented products, both veggie and dairy. You can eat real food again!
    I highly recommend it for the humans out there.

    Sorry this is so long, but you really “pushed” my nutrition button with this one! So happy to see that there is interest in feeding our critters and ourselves better, for better health. You really are what you assimilate, you know.

    Blessings to you all! Any further questions, I’m so happy to answer. We are living proof that this really is the ticket to good, robust health for ourselves and our beloved animal companions.
    Katy

  2. lhasalhady says:

    Katy, thanks for taking the time to share your own experiences and knowledge. It certainly makes sense to me.

  3. Chris Geiser says:

    Katy,

    Thank you for the detailed information!! I can’t wait to make the fermented veggies.

    Question… I’ve been making Rejuvalac according to Dr. Ann Wigmore’s instructions, which involves fermenting wheat berries in water. Can this fermented water (grain based) be used to make the fermented veggies instead of the whey (dairy based)?

    You have inspired me to learn more about fermented foods, both for my dogs and myself!

    Chris

  4. Katy Widger says:

    Yes, the water from the Rejuvelac can certainly be used to ferment veggies. Use the first water for best results. The same recipe is in the Nourishing Traditions book, and I have made this, also. The Whey just introduces the lactic bacteria immediately, but fermentation just naturally “happens” when sugars are present, as with grapes fermenting into wine. The “good” bacteria necessary for this wonderful process occurs naturally on the surface of the wheat berries, or grapes, or whatever fruit or grain or veggie we choose to ferment.

  5. Katy Widger says:

    Great books on Fermentation:
    Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD ISBN 0-96708973-5
    Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz ISBN 1-931498-23-7

    Note to above post: I should have said this to everyone: You can ferment veggies without using whey at all. Just use an additional 1 T. sea salt. The salt inhibits the production of undesirable bacteria while allowing the beneficial bacteria time to reproduce and “ferment” the veggies in a timely manner. I use whey because I have it in abundance, it introduces the correct kind of lactic bacteria immediately, and I am assured of a good end product.

  6. Katy Widger says:

    Gail asked me why Cod Liver Oil instead of Flaxoil, and I just came across this expanation:

    Flaxseed Oil vs. Cod Liver Oil
    Flax oil and other vegetable sources of omega 3 do not contain any DHA or EPA. They contain a form of omega 3 fatty acids that is not as usable by the body. Your biochemistry would need several specific metabolic enzymes (NOT digestive enzymes) in certain concentrations in order to convert any of the vegetable omega 3 to DHA and EPA. Even in ideal circumstances, only small amounts are converted.

  7. lhasalhady says:

    Katy, are you familiar with Kombucha Mushrooms? A friend suggested I use it for its anti-inflammatory properties. The mushrooms are fermented. I did purchase the mushrooms, but need to get to Denver for a large glass tea jar.


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