Native Tibetan Woman with Apso

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This beautiful photo was taken by the late Barbara Ratledge, Las-A-Rab Lhasa Apsos in Canada. Barbara made several trips to the Himalayas and was an avid supporter of the Gompa dogs. During one of her trips she met, and interviewed, Lama Gyen Yeshe.

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4 Comments on “Native Tibetan Woman with Apso”

  1. i’m fascinated by the Gompa dogs. Do you have access to the full interview?
    thanks

  2. lhasalhady says:

    I can’t seem to get that link to work within the comments…perhaps the file name is too long. I’m having the same problem with linking the blog to the Put the Pen to the Paper area of the website. So, here’s how to get to the interview..from FFT Home (which is in the left hand column under Links) go to the Put the Pen to the Paper page and, in Articles, scroll down to Interview with Lama Gyen Yeshe.

  3. lhasalhady says:

    Yippee!! I’ve got it figured out! You can now get to Put the Pen to the Paper from What’s New. And here’s the direct link to Barbara Ratledge’s interview with Lama Gyen Yeshe. http://www.fleetfiretimbers.com/FFT/Articles/InterviewWithLamaGyenYeshe.htm

  4. Katy says:

    Great interview! It answers my question as to what the traditional diet of the Apso was/is. I also read on an Austrailian site a reference to their eating “land snails” as part of their diet in Tibet. That would give them an excellent source of protein. I also wonder if their vegetarian diet was linked to the veggie diet of the monks and their exclusive habitation in the monasteries?
    Zeke does not care for carbs of any kind, but he does love our raw goat milk and cheese and kefir. I am wondering if I should try and include some of these grains in his diet in some way. (I give him a supplement that has barley and wheatgrass in it, along with many other veggies and herbs).
    Interestingly, oats, barley and maize (corn) are the three “goat” grains that goats eat and thrive on, along with grass and alfalfa. Wheat has been so hybridized in modern times as to be nearly unrecognizable as the protein-rich grain it used to be. Spelt comes closest now as a true “wheat”.


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